Health and Wellness FAQs

  • 1. FAQ Thermography
  • 2. FAQ Thermography Article
  • 3. FAQ RDS/CRPS
  • 4. FAQ Mammography
  • 5. FAQ Breast Health
  • 6. FAQ Health and Healing
  • 7. FAQ Nutrition
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  • 1. Are All Thermographers Created Equal?
     

    In our estimation, the Mikron Thermographic equipment which was the first equipment built for medical application is still the best and the only systems we use. Most other cameras were built for industrial application and have been modified for medical uses. Because medical thermography needs to be replicated, none of these other systems have been adequately able to control the “drift” factor. This allows for too much inconsistency.

    Next, we are concerned that many thermographers are not taking enough images. We have seen as few as three images being called a complete study. The proper guidelines for breast thermography call for two sets of nine images each, taken in black and white and color with a cold challenge between sets. Thyroid/dental and neuromuscular studies vary in the number of images taken. It is imperative, however, that the interpreting physician measure contralateral regions of interest on the actual images for comparative purposes.

    It is imperative that the study be done under the controlled conditions established by the international thermographic community. These include temperature controls, reduction of ambient light, and careful monitoring of air flow. The images should be taken by a trained technician and interpreted by a certified, licensed health care practitioner. We believe there needs to be a line of communication between the patient and the doctor reading the thermogram. Ours is the only local center where everything is done in house.

    We are also aware of individuals performing “full body scans”. They claim to provide substantial information regarding abnormalities of many of the body’s systems (including the breast) with a single set of one dimensional temperature readings. This should not be confused with traditional medical thermography.

  • 2. How Can I Learn More About Thermography?
     

    In addition to the volume of information on the internet, Dr. Getson is available to speak to your group or association. Please contact the office at 856-596-5834 for more information or to schedule a lecture.

  • 3. How Do I Understand My Thermographic Report?
     

    Color Thermography is based upon the assumption that the body is symmetrical unto itself. We realize that NO ONE is completely symmetrical in terms of size, shape or temperature. For that reason we allow up to 1.5 degrees C and still consider it to be normal. The only exception is at the nipples where the maximum limit of normal is 1.0 degrees C.

    As the patient faces the camera for the images to be taken, what is seen on the left side of the picture is on the right side of the body (in those images where both breasts are present on the same frame).

    The circles that are drawn on the pictures are drawn by Dr. Getson and the data beneath each picture is calculated by the computer. The most important information on the data table is the second line, “average” which is the average temperature within the circle on the picture above.

    When viewing the black and white images, circles are placed around blood vessels to highlight their presence. Having blood vessels is not necessarily abnormal, as the presence of vessels results from trauma to the breast. Once present these vessels will be evident forever. Trauma can occur in many forms such as seatbelt impact from a car accident, other types of contact injury, and even Mammograms. Some blood vessel configurations are worrisome and these will be discussed.

    Following is a definition of some thermographic terms:

    • VASCULAR COMPLETE: An uninterrupted blood vessel usually of two inches or more in length.
    • FRAGMENTED VASCULAR ANARCHY: Bits and pieces of a blood vessel.
    • INFERIOR VESSEL: A heat generating vessel that lies below the horizontal plane of the nipple.
    • HOT SPOT: A solitary area of heat in one breast exceeding 1.5 degrees C.
    • GLOBAL HEAT: A generalized area of heat exceeding 1.5 degrees C.
    • PERIAREOLAR HEAT: Heat in excess of 1.5 degrees C in the area surrounding the nipple.
  • 4. Is Thermography an Approved Procedure?
     

    Yes, it was approved by the FDA in 1982. Also in 1984 the American Medical Association certified thermography as being “beyond the experimental and investigational stage.”

  • 5. Is Thermography Costly?
     

    Our fee for breast Thermography is $300.00. Approximately two weeks after the study the patient will receive a packet. The packet will include two sets of nine images each, one set in color and one set in black and white. A comprehensive report by Dr. Getson and a universal claim form will also be included. A copy of the report is provided to the clinician(s) of your choice. When applicable, a phone conference with Dr. Getson is provided at no additional cost.

    The cost for a thyroid/dental thermogram is $125.00. This study consists of nine images which are a mixture of color and black and white images, Dr. Getson’s report, a universal claim form and when necessary a follow-up phone conference with Dr. Getson. A copy of the report is provided to the clinician(s) of your choice.

    The cost of a neuromuscular thermogram depends upon the complexity of the study. Please call the office for more information regarding this study.

  • 6. Is Thermography Covered by Insurance?
     

    Payment is required at the time of service. For reimbursement purposes, each patient is provided with a universal claim form which includes CPT and ICD-9 codes for them to submit to insurer for reimbursement. In the case of breast thermography we have found that the insurers are more likely to reimburse individuals with dense breasts, scarring from prior surgery, history of breast disease be it themselves or a family member (particularly in women under 40 years of age), breast implants, neuropathic pain and in women with inconclusive anatomic studies. In these instances a physician’s prescription may be helpful in facilitating reimbursement.

  • 7. My Doctor Doesn’t Know Much About Thermography
     

    My doctor does not know much about thermography and isn’t sure it is a valid diagnostic tool. How should I respond to this?

    1. The camera is FDA approved.
    2. The AMA approved thermography as an adjunctive test for the diagnosis of breast disease in 1982.
    3. In 1984 the American Medical Association certified that thermography was “beyond the experimental and investigational stages.”
    4. Over the last ten years there have been great technological advances in thermal imaging cameras and their accompanying computer software.
    5. Part of the problem lies with the fact that thermography was inappropriately placed in the Detection Demonstration Project. Medical thermography has been available for over 50 years, predating mammography by a decade.

    Once the study was completed it was apparent that it had serious flaws. Part of the problem with the confusion regarding thermography is that it was inappropriately placed in DATTA Study. Many of the testing sites were mobile trailers without any temperature or environmental controls. In a diagnostic test that depends primarily on temperature measurement, this was an inexcusable omission. Next, the “technicians” who performed the studies had little or no training. Finally, the interpreters were radiologists who had no expertise in the interpretation of thermal images, many of whom where operating under the misguided premise that the evaluation of thermograms was “simple.” Moreover, it was not until the 1980s that the thermographic community established standard protocols and formal training.

    How then could the study with all of its inherent flaws have stood a chance of accurately evaluating thermography? And yet to this day critics of thermography still rely on this thirty-year-old study while choosing to ignore the monumental advances in thermal imaging.

    Over the last ten years the incidence of breast cancer has doubled. Is it not incumbent upon us to use every proven diagnostic tool available for the earliest detection of breast disease?

    The use of thermography in the diagnosis of neuropathic pain is best explained by reading Dr. Getson’s article titled “The Use of Thermography in the Diagnosis of CRPS: A Physician’s Opinion”. Click here to read this article.

  • 8. Should I Have a Mammogram?
     

    This is an individual decision which must be made by each patient. Due to the high number of false negatives inherent in mammograms, it is becoming increasingly apparent that no one diagnostic test is sufficient for the assessment of breast disease. Mammographers acknowledge a 15% to 20% false negative rate, a number made higher by women with dense breasts, implants, and scar tissue. Due to the fact that thermography is a physiologic study and the results are not affected by these anatomic issues, additional information can be provided which is not readily available on a mammogram. Further, it has been shown that a positive (abnormal) infra-red image is the single most important marker of increased risk for the development of breast cancer.1

  • 9. What About Ultrasound and MRI?
     

    We have found that the addition of Ultrasound to Thermography has been very useful. Because thermography can often localize an abnormality often to one quadrant of the breast, we are able to provide the ultrasound technician with a “road map” so that the study can be concentrated in a small area thereby increasing the effectiveness of this test.

    With the increased usage of MRI’s there has been a natural segue between these two tests. The MRI has provided a “large screen” view of the breasts which when coupled with thermographic imaging has been found to be extremely effective in diagnosing breast disease. Breast MRI’s use a contrast dye called Gadolinium which is water soluble and excreted in the urine within 24 hours. In healthy individuals there have been very limited side effects to this drug.

    Both of these studies have the added advantage of providing information without the use of radiation.

  • 10. What Should I Expect from a Breast Thermogram?
     

    The room is maintained at 68-70 degrees, the ideal temperature for thermographic testing. The patient disrobes from the waist up. The patient then equilibrates to the room temperature for ten minutes. The patient is standing about 3 feet from the camera with her arms resting on top of her head. There is no physical contact, no compression, or radiation. Two sets of nine thermographic images are taken by a female technician. After the first set of images are taken, the patient is asked to hold an ice pack for one minute. In Thermography this is called a “cold challenge.” The cold challenge provides additional information by determining whether blood vessels dilate or not, allowing us to better define suspicious vessels in the black and white views. The second set of images is taken, the patient dresses and departs. Usual time spent in the office is 30 minutes start to finish.

  • 11. What Should I Expect from a Neuromuscular Study?
     

    The room is maintained at 68-70 degrees, the ideal temperature for thermographic testing. The patient disrobes to their undergarments. We provide disposable undergarments for men and women. If you prefer to wear your own we ask women to wear a thong and our disposable bra and men are asked to wear an athletic supporter or bikini briefs. This level of exposure is necessary in order for us to image the buttocks which are an integral part of the study. Usual time spent in the office varies between thirty and sixty minutes depending upon the complexity of the study.

  • 12. What Should I Expect from a Thyroid/Dental Study?
     

    The room is maintained at 68-70 degrees, the ideal temperature for thermographic testing. We encourage attire that exposes the patient’s entire neck or they may be asked to remove their shirt only. Nine images are then taken of the face and neck. Usual time spent in the office is twenty minutes.

  • 13. When Will I Get My Report?
     

    A copy of the images and a written report of the findings will be sent to the patient within 14 days of the study. A copy of the report will be sent to the healthcare professional upon request.

  • 14. Who Is Qualified to Take and Interpret Thermographic Images?
     

    The performance of thermographic imaging should only be done by a board certified or board eligible technician. The interpretation of these images must be done by a licensed health care provider (D.O., M.D., D.C.) who has been certified by a recognized thermographic organization. These clinicians are the only ones trained to interpret and apply the information garnered from the thermogram.

  • 1. Thermography: A preventive screening tool for breast health
     

    By Erika Horowitz, ND, MSOM

    Breast cancer is the second-leading cause of death among women, behind lung cancer. According to the American Cancer Association, in 2007 an estimated 178,480 new cases of invasive breast cancer will be diagnosed among women, as well as an estimated 62,030 additional cases of in situ breast cancer. In addition, approximately 40,460 women are expected to have died from breast cancer in 2007 (American Cancer Association, n.d.). Epidemiological studies estimate that one in eight women will develop breast cancer during their lifetimes.

    Moreover, one in five women with breast cancer will die of the disease, despite the considerable advances in treatment (Keyserlingk, 1998). Given these circumstances, early detection of breast cancer is considered an important prognostic factor. There is general consensus that earlier detection of breast cancer can improve survival rates, resulting in a 30%-40% reduction in deaths from breast cancer within 10 years from detection (Roebuck, 1986). Adoption of screening programs has been based on the premise that early detection leads to early treatment, which leads to better survival rates...

    Read the Full Article

  • 2. The Best Breast Test: The Promise of Thermography
     

    By: Christiane Northrup, MD

    Every year when Breast Cancer Awareness Month (October) comes around I am saddened and surprised that thermography hasn't become more popular. Part of this is my mindset. I'd rather focus on breast health and ways to prevent breast cancer at the cellular level than put the emphasis on testing and retesting until you finally do find something to poke, prod, cut out, or radiate. I understand that mammography has been the gold standard for years. Doctors are the most familiar with this test, and many believe that a mammogram is the best test for detecting breast cancer early. But it's not. Studies show that a thermogram identifies precancerous or cancerous cells earlier, produces unambiguous results (which cuts down on additional testing), and doesn't hurt the body. Isn't this what women really want?...

    Read the Full Article

  • 3. IACT A Review of Breast Thermolgraphy
     

    By William C. Amalu, DC, DIACT (B), FIACT

    Introduction

    The first recorded use of thermobiological diagnostics can be found in the writings of Hippocrates around 480 B.C.[1]. A mud slurry spread over the patient was observed for areas that would dry first and was thought to indicate underlying organ pathology. Since this time, continued research and clinical observations proved that certain temperatures related to the human body were indeed indicative of normal and abnormal physiologic processes. In the 1950's, military research into infrared monitoring systems for night time troop movements ushered in a new era in thermal diagnostics. The first use of diagnostic thermography came in 1957 when R. Lawson discovered that the skin temperature over a cancer in the breast was higher than that of normal tissue[2].

    Read the Full Article

  • 4. Effectiveness of a Noninvasive Digital Infrared Thermal Imaging System in the Detection of Breast Cancer
     

    Digital infrared thermal imaging (DITI) is a noninvasive, non-contact system of recording body temperature by measuring infrared radiation emitted by the body surface. This technology was originally designed for US military use in night vision but also has many applications in medicine. Its use in the field of medical oncology lies in the fact that tumors generally have an increase in blood supply and angiogenesis, as well as an increased metabolic rate, which in turn translates into increased temperature gradients compared to surrounding normal tissue. Detecting these infrared "hotspots" and gradients can thereby help to identify and diagnose malignancy.

    Read the Full Article

  • 5. Breast Thermography: Can It Open a Window for Breast Cancer Prevention?
     

    by: Erik L. Goldman

    Ifs radiation-free, non-invasive, FDA-approved, relatively inexpensive, and detects early, potentially reversible physiological changes associated with later development of breast cancer. So, why isn't breast thermography a routine part of women's health practice?

    If really ought to be, say a growing number of physicians who are re-discovering this long-overlooked imaging method. Advocates say it's a technology whose time has come, not so much as a substitute for mammography, but as a method of identifying tissue which tumors are more likely to emerge...

    Read the Full Article

  • 6. About Breast Thermography
     

    By: Philip Getson, DO & Liesha Getson, CTT

    The American Cancer Society's (ACS) statistics on breast cancer are shocking Every three minutes, in the United States alone, another woman is diagnosed with this dreaded disease, which annually claims the lives of more than 40,000 women.

    With the incidences of breast cancer on the rise, and prevention now considered more valuable than cure, women are beginning to educate themselves on the option of including a thermogram in their annual checkup. This little known tool for risk assessment measures thermal emissions emanating from the body, a key indicator of health. Available here in the U.S, since the 1960's, it was approved in 1982 as an adjunct to mammography...

    Read the Full Article

  • 7. Breast Screenings: Data and Decisions 101
     

    This is an excerpt of an article in 4Wholeness.com

    Another way to produce images of the breast for study is by using thermography — a form of infrared imaging that produces a picture of the breast that maps temperature variations. On his website, Dr. Philip Getson describes this technology: "Medical thermography uses infrared technology to provide an image of the body's physiological responses. By detecting thermal asymmetry or by noting alterations of the vascular patterns, the physician now has more information with which to make an assessment of breast, neurological and other conditions." Certified Clinical Thermographer Catherine Johnson further explained that such imaging shows temperature differences that can correlate with various types of abnormalities, of which malignancy could be one...

    Dr. Getson explained that while a mammogram study shows us how the breast looks, the thermogram creates a picture of the way it works. He describes thermography as a "breast health risk assessment tool."...

    As with mammography, ask about the credentials of both who performs the test and who reads it. Dr. Getson emphasized that the test should be performed by a board certified or board eligible technician and it should be interpreted by a licensed health care provider...

    Read the Full Article

  • 1. What is RSD? And how does one experience it?
     

    RSD or Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (now known as Complex Regional Pain Syndrome or CRPS) is a problem caused by malfunctioning of the autonomic nervous system. It usually occurs after a traumatic injury. It is characterized by intense pain, usually burning in nature, which seems to be out of proportion to the event which caused the problem.

    Other symptoms include muscle spasms or tremors, increased sensitivity to even light touch, atrophy, increased sweating, color and/or temperature changes, altered hair and nail growth. Patients may also experience many internal manifestations such as hoarseness, sensitivity to light and sound, digestive issues, bladder problems, irregular heart rhythms, gynecologic issues, memory loss and compromised immune system functioning.

  • 2. What causes RSD/CRPS?
     

    Most of the patients that I have examined have developed problems following an injury. Sometimes this is a motor-vehicle accident, a fall or other significant trauma. However, I have seen the devastating effects of the disorder following relatively innocuous events such as an inadvertent needle stick by a seamstress.

  • 3. How common is this problem?
     

    It is currently estimated that anywhere from 1 to 5 million Americans have been diagnosed with this disorder. It is my opinion that the estimates are low and that the condition is far more widespread.

  • 4. If so many people have RSD/CRPS, why haven't I heard more about it?
     

    RSD/CRPS has no national spokesperson and research funding is limited. Furthermore, because the disease is poorly understood, the chronic pain from RSD/CRPS may be mistaken for pain from other physical or psychological conditions. This leads to a decrease in accurate diagnoses.

  • 5. How is RSD/CRPS diagnosed?
     

    As with most medical conditions, your doctor will take a comprehensive history and perform a physical exam. Some of the aforementioned symptoms may be evident.

    Conventional testing such as x-ray, CAT scan and MRI will serve only to eliminate other possible disorders but will not confirm the diagnosis of CRPS. Nuclear bone scans, once though to be a diagnostic aid have proven otherwise.

    I have found that the only test that has proven to be accurate is thermography or Infrared imaging which will show the sympathetic dysfunction and identify the disorder. This test is contact-free and painless making it ideal for a pain-afflicted individual.

  • 6. Treatment Options for RSD
     

    There are multiple available treatment options. However, treatment always begins with mobilization. Physical and occupational therapy are helpful in the early stages. However, the patient should be cautioned to be extremely careful in their choice of therapy because excessive or incorrect therapy can be quite harmful.

    Many also use medications to treat the symptoms. Medications include anti-seizure drugs, muscle relaxants, anti-inflammatory agents and pain medicines.

    Interventional treatments include injections, infusions and implanted devices.

    Treatment of concurrent problems, such as fractures, disc disorders or other injuries is essential to achieve the best possible outcome in RSD/CRPS treatment.

    Recent studies have shown that infusions of Ketamine have been of great help. Ongoing research is testing new forms of treatment.

    We have also found that dietary changes have made a substantial difference in reducing the pain and other symptoms. Adjusting the diet to exclude gluten and other highly inflammatory foods has been greatly successful.

    Additionally, a positive attitude and support from family and friends leads to better outcomes.

  • 7. I have read that unless you begin treatment within six weeks of onset, the results are bad. Is this true?
     

    As with any disorder, the earlier the treatment is initiated the better the outcome. However, we have been fortunate to have good results in individuals afflicted for months and even years.

  • 8. Is RSD Curable?
     

    No, but this is not unusual in medicine. Many diseases are not "curable" but are treatable and controllable. This is the goal of treatment in RSD/CRPS — to control the dysfunction and facilitate a relatively normal lifestyle.

  • 9. Who is most susceptible to getting RSD/CRPS?
     

    Women get the disorder about four times more often than men. There is no age limitation — I have treated patients from 6 to 88 years of age.

    Some theories suggest a genetic predisposition for the disorder. In fact, I have treated more than a dozen families with more than one member who suffers from RSD/CRPS.

  • 10. Difference Between RSD and Fibromyalgia
     

    This is a really interesting point. In my opinion, fibromyalgia is really a form of CRPS. Fibromyalgia and RSD/CRPS have many similarities: Both involve serious pain and mostly afflict women. However, CRPS is far more involved with more intense pain levels and internal organ manifestations.

  • 11. How can I get more information about RSD/CRPS?
     

    There are many groups and associations that can provide more information. The national organization is the Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Association of America.There are many groups and associations that can provide more information. The national organization is the Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Association of America.

  • 12. How can I find a specialist to treat my RSD?
     

    Most family doctors and specialists do not have specialized knowledge in the evaluation and treatment of RSD/CRPS. The RSD Association can provide you with an individual in your area who has been shown to demonstrate expertise. Often, however, it becomes necessary to travel to find a physician who treats the disorder on a full-time basis and is up to date with the most current information.

  • 1. Breast Screenings: Data and Decisions 101
     

    This is an excerpt of an article in 4Wholeness.com

    Another way to produce images of the breast for study is by using thermography — a form of infrared imaging that produces a picture of the breast that maps temperature variations. On his website, Dr. Philip Getson describes this technology: "Medical thermography uses infrared technology to provide an image of the body's physiological responses. By detecting thermal asymmetry or by noting alterations of the vascular patterns, the physician now has more information with which to make an assessment of breast, neurological and other conditions." Certified Clinical Thermographer Catherine Johnson further explained that such imaging shows temperature differences that can correlate with various types of abnormalities, of which malignancy could be one...

    Dr. Getson explained that while a mammogram study shows us how the breast looks, the thermogram creates a picture of the way it works. He describes thermography as a "breast health risk assessment tool."...

    As with mammography, ask about the credentials of both who performs the test and who reads it. Dr. Getson emphasized that the test should be performed by a board certified or board eligible technician and it should be interpreted by a licensed health care provider...

    Read the Full Article

  • 2. The Mammogram Dilemma
     

    By: Susan McLeod-Harrison

    I'm a 40-something woman and you know what that means. I should be having mammograms yearly. At least that's what the American Cancer Institute says. "

    Although the US Preventive Services Task Force now says the exam should usually start at 50, who doesn't start worrying at 40? The Breast Cancer Research Foundation's home page says: "The biggest risks for breast cancer are being a woman and aging." This statement seems like a scare tactic in light of the fact that most women will never get breast cancer...

    Read the Full Article

  • 3. The Breast Cancer Screening Mistake Millions Make
     

    By Dr. Mercola

    A new study reported in the New England Journal of Medicine suggests that increased awareness and improved treatments rather than mammograms are the main force in reducing the breast cancer death rate.

    The study, medical experts say, is the first to assess the benefit of mammography in the context of the modern era of breast cancer treatment.

    While it is unlikely to settle the debate over mammograms — and experts continue to disagree about the value of the test — it indicates that improved treatments with hormonal therapy and other targeted drugs may have, in a way, washed out most of mammography's benefits by making it less important to find cancers when they are too small to feel...

    Read the Full Article

  • 4. Screening for Breast Cancer with Mammography
     

    Published by The Nordic Cochrane Centre 2012

    What you always wanted to know about breast screening

    What are the benefits and harms of attending a screening programme for breast cancer?

    How many will benefit from being screened, and how many will be harmed?

    What is the scientific evidence for this?

    Read the Full Article

  • 5. Dangers and Unreliability of Mammography
     

    By Samuel S. Epstein, Rosalie Bertell, and Barbara Seaman

    Mammography screening is a profit-driven technology posing risks compounded by unreliability. In striking contrast, annual clinical breast examination (CBE) by a trained health professional, together with monthly breast self-examination (BSE), is safe, at least as effective, and low in cost. International programs for training nurses how to perform CBE and teach BSE are critical and overdue.

    Contrary to popular belief and assurances by the U. S. media and the cancer establishment- the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and American Cancer Society (ACS)- mammography is not a technique for early diagnosis. In fact, a breast cancer has usually been present for about eight years before it can finally be detected. Furthermore, screening should be recognized as damage control, rather than misleadingly as "secondary prevention."...

    Read the Full Article

  • 6. 10,000 Deaths a Year Due to False and Misleading Mammogram Reports
     

    By: Julie Marron & Thomas Nearney

    Each year, nearly 40 million women in the United States obtain screening mammograms for the early detection of breast cancer. For 40% of them - over 15 million women - a mammogram alone is an ineffective screening tool. This information is systematically withheld from these patients, who often rely on false and misleading mammogram results. Our analysis demonstrates that between 40,000 and 45,000 women each year receive false negative mammogram reports, meaning that their cancer is allowed to spread undetected and untreated.

    False negative mammograms are not reported or tracked in the United States. However, their impact on the lives of these women and their families is tragic, as an estimated 10,000 will die as a result of the undetected cancer...

    Read the Full Article

  • 1. Women with Gene Defects and Risk for Breast Cancer
     

    By: Dr. Mercola

    Some days I wonder if this is all a bad dream. How on earth have we come to this craziness? The latest and greatest "preventative" strategy for women genetically predisposed to breast cancer is amputation, which puts the wheels in motion for this type of "preventive surgery" to be covered by health insurance.

    I'm referring, of course, to Angelina Jolie's recent and very public decision to undergo a double mastectomy as a prophylactic measure.  While she admits this is a very personal decision, the impacts to the public could be quite significant based on her celebrity influence.

    Why Does US Recommendations Place Women with Gene Defects at Even Greater Risk? ...

    Read the Full Article

  • 2. The Breast Cancer Breakthrough that's Making Experts Angry
     

    By Dr. Mercola

    The use of mammograms has dropped following recommendations by a medical task force that women in their 40s may not need to get breast cancer screenings every year. Studies suggest that fewer physicians are recommending annual mammograms for women in their 40s, and that fewer patients in that age group are getting screened.

    In November of 2009, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, a federal advisory board, said that yearly mammograms should not necessarily be automatic at age 40. They did recommend routine mammography screenings every two years for women ages 50 to 74.

    Read the Full Article

  • 3. Recommendations for Breast Health
     

    by Dr. David Williams

    Breast Massage Technique Will Enhance Lymphatic Drainage Research indicates that wearing a bra for prolonged periods of time during the day can impede the drainage of harmful fluids from breast glands. The following massage technique, done once a night, will enhance lymphatic drainage from the breast.

    Read the Full Article

  • 4. New Studies Reveal Alarming Hidden Cause of Breast Cancer
     

    By Samuel S. Epstein, Rosalie Bertell, and Barbara Seaman

    International Journal of Health Services, 31(3):605-615, 2001.

    Mammography screening is a profit-driven technology posing risks compounded by unreliability. In striking contrast, annual clinical breast examination (CBE) by a trained health professional, together with monthly breast self-examination (BSE), is safe, at least as effective, and low in cost. International programs for training nurses how to perform CBE and teach BSE are critical and overdue.

    Contrary to popular belief and assurances by the U. S. media and the cancer establishment- the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and American Cancer Society (ACS)- mammography is not a technique for early diagnosis. In fact, a breast cancer has usually been present for about eight years before it can finally be detected. Furthermore, screening should be recognized as damage control, rather than misleadingly as "secondary prevention."

    Read the Full Article

  • 5. Bras and Breast Cancer Incidence
     

    FINDINGS (reported from correlational study): "Women who wear a bra 24 hours a day are 125 times as likely to develop [breast] cancer as women who don't wear one ... Women who wore bras for more than 12 hours (per day) but did not sleep in them had 21 times the risk as women who wore bras for less than 12 hours" ...

    "Singer [found that] 'three out four women who wore their daytime bras to sleep contracted breast cancer.' So did one out of seven women strapped into a bra more than 12 hours a day." ...

    Read the Full Article

  • 6. American Cancer Society Statistics on Breast Cancer
     

    The American Cancer Society's (ACS) statistics on breast cancer are shocking. Every three minutes in the United States alone, another woman is diagnosed with the dreaded disease, which annually claims the lives of more than 40,000 women.

    Read the Full Article

  • 1. What is Serrapeptase
     

    What is Serrapeptase?

    Serrapeptase is an enzyme naturally produced by friendly serratia bacteria living in the intestines of silkworms. Living organisms produce enzymes to help speed up specific chemical processes. Jn the case of serrapeptase, it helps speed up the breakdown of proteins, making it a proteolytic enzyme (1).

    Serrapeptase Benefits

    Although the role of serrapeptase in nature is to literally eat through silkworm cocoons, researchers have found that it performs other hugely beneficial tasks in the human body. When taken orally on an empty stomach , serrapeptase is absorbed by the small intestine and enters the bloodstream (2). There it works throughout the body to break down protein debris that over-stimulates the immune system and triggers inflammation . It also digests proteins that make up scar tissue, blood clots, cysts, mucus and arterial plaques, among others (3]. Since living tissue is not broken down by serrapeptase, taking serrapeptase enzyme supplements poses no threat to healthy tissue or cells.

    Read the Full Article

  • 2. A Natural Approach to Insulin Resistance
     

    by Marcelle Pick, OB/GYN NP

    Insulin resistance — also called syndrome X — is so pervasive today that we evaluate nearly every woman who visits our clinic to determine her level of risk. Most are taken aback when they learn they either already have insulin resistance syndrome (some are even pre-diabetic) or are well on their way to developing it. Experts estimate that 25% of all Americans suffer from insulin resistance. We believe the percentage is much higher among perimenopausal women.

    Read the Full Article

  • 3. Estrogen Dominance — Is It Real?
     

    by Marcelle Pick, OB/GYN NP

    Most conventional doctors still tell women that menopause — and all menopause and pre-menopausal symptoms — result from a drop in estrogen production. [n their view the solution is estrogen supplementation, or HRT, usually with synthetic hormones. In contrast, many alternative practitioners believe that women have too much estrogen, leading to a condition known as "estrogen dominance."…

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  • 4. Ionizing Radiation
     

    Among the many sources of ionizing radiation are traditional X-rays, computed tomography (CT) scans, fluoroscopy, and other medical radiological procedures. A newer source of X-rays is the use of backscatter scanners in airport security (Brenner, 2011). Sources of gamma rays include emissions from nuclear power plants, scientific research involving radionuclides, military weapons testing, and nuclear medicine procedures such as bone, thyroid and lung scans (EPA, 2005).

    In 2005, the National Toxicology Program classified X-radiation and gamma radiation as known human carcinogens. Although some scientists challenge this prenme (e.g., Habron, 2012), most agree that there is no such thing as a safe dose of radiation (Brenner, 2003; NRPB, 1995). A 2005 National Research Council report confirms this finding stating that "the risk of cancer proceeds in a linear  fashion at lower doses [of ionizing radiation] without a threshold and ... the smallest dose has the potential to cause a small increase in risk to humans" (NRC, 2005).

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  • 1. Why Living and Raw Food?
     

    Everyone knows it is healthy t9 eat fresh, uncooked fruits and green vegetables every day. That isn't a new concept. A living and raw foods lifestyle simply says that these foods should be the majority of what we eat. Anyone can enjoy improved health and vitality by incorporating and abundance of these foods into their daily diet.

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  • 2. The Living and Raw Food Groups
     

    Learn about the Living and Raw Food Groups.

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  • 3. The Top 10 Reasons to Buy Organic
     

    Learn about the top 10 reasons to buy organic including: protect future generations, prevent soil erosion, protect water quality, save endrgy, and more.

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  • 4. The 10 Most Common Toxins
     

    The following toxins are among the most prevalent in our air, water and/or food supply. This list is by no means all-inclusive, as thousands of other toxins are also circulating in our environment. Keep reading to find out tips to avoid these toxins and others as much as possible.

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  • 5. Label Detectives Resource Sheet
     

    Learn about the top 10 foods to avoid, the top 10 personal care ingredients to avoid, and the top 10 cleaning ingredients to avoid.

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  • 6. Intentional Remedies
     

    Three essential oil sprays, crafted to assist you in creating your desired intentions. Choose Abundance, or Clean the Air..., to dissipate disruptive energy and germs, or Love Potion #7 , to increase unconditional love of self and others.

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  • 7. How to Balance Sugar Cravings
     

    Suggestions to help you find a healthy middle ground between no sugar and sugar binges.

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  • 8. "Free Glutamate" Free Diet
     

    by: David A. Steenblock D.O.

    Most people have heard of "monosodium glutamate" (MSG), but ask them what it is, and most will say "a preservative?" Therein lies the tragedy. Because "MSG" is not a preservative, but an "excitotoxin", and excitotoxicity is just as the name implies: toxic.

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  • 9. Food Label Terminology Guide
     

    This information will help you read a food label. It is based on the research we have done by interviewing food processors and experts in the field of food science.

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